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Thread: Major league innovations

  1. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by Bellhorn04 View Post
    Unfortunately, those boxes highlight some horrible balls and strikes calls by the human umps.
    And some of those may win or lose games. Use technology to assist the umpire where it is easy to do, like ball and strike calls!

  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bellhorn04 View Post
    Unfortunately, those boxes highlight some horrible balls and strikes calls by the human umps.
    And those boxes also show us how accurate many umpires are, Mr. Glass Half-Empty.

    I know I have said it before, but the job of a home plate umpire has always been to determine if a ball thrown anywhere from 80 to 100 mph touched any part of an imaginary box. It's not easy. Heck, it's not even easy to see a ball traveling at 100 mph. I am shocked at how often they get the borderline calls right (assuming the K Zone is right, of course).

    None of this excuses Angel Hernandez or Joe West, however. And nothing ever willl ...

  3. #78
    Quote Originally Posted by notin View Post
    (assuming the K Zone is right, of course).
    I despise those outlined boxes on TV. They cause me a lot of unnecessary agita, constantly worrying about batters or pitchers getting hosed... especially, since we know the angle of the imaginary box can't possibly be perfect over the pitcher's shoulder. If cameras were exactly centered behind the mound, we'd just see a lot of pitchers' backs (except for guys who stand at the side of the rubber).

    Games are enjoyable without being deceived by something that doesn't even exist on the field. This is one of the reasons I can relax listening to games on the radio (secretly hoping announcers are calling what they're seeing, and not reporting replays of fake boxes).

  4. #79
    Deity Bellhorn04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by notin View Post
    And those boxes also show us how accurate many umpires are, Mr. Glass Half-Empty.

    I know I have said it before, but the job of a home plate umpire has always been to determine if a ball thrown anywhere from 80 to 100 mph touched any part of an imaginary box. It's not easy. Heck, it's not even easy to see a ball traveling at 100 mph. I am shocked at how often they get the borderline calls right (assuming the K Zone is right, of course).

    None of this excuses Angel Hernandez or Joe West, however. And nothing ever willl ...
    Yeah, I said the calls were horrible, but I fully agree that it's a tough job.
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  5. #80
    Deity Bellhorn04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5GoldGloves:OF,75 View Post
    I despise those outlined boxes on TV.
    Truth be told I follow most games on Gameday now as I'm multi-tasking.

    Seeing bad calls on Gameday can be ever more unsettling than seeing them live. You receive two pieces of blatantly contradictory information.
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  6. #81
    Quote Originally Posted by Bellhorn04 View Post
    Truth be told I follow most games on Gameday now as I'm multi-tasking.

    Seeing bad calls on Gameday can be ever more unsettling than seeing them live. You receive two pieces of blatantly contradictory information.
    We look at Gameday sometimes, too. I assume their box is more precise in location, since it's directly behind the batter (that would certainly account for a different zone, if it doesn't line up with views over a pitcher's shoulder).

  7. #82
    All-Star jad's Avatar
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    Did you see Verducci's article in SI whining that the shift should be outlawed because it so hurt Jay Bruce's career (a .244 career hitter). I love the logic: he's slow, and can't hit to all fields, doesn't have too much power, so IT'S NOT FAIR!!!! I suppose by the same logic: there are a lot of AA players who cannot hit curve balls. THEREFORE, the curve ball needs to be banned.

    Or was the whole damn article written tongue-in-cheek? (If so, just call me the usual names and move on.)
    I owe Bellhorn04 $100 (virtual), which I will pay off with two tix to a Seadogs game in 2021.

  8. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by jad View Post
    Did you see Verducci's article in SI whining that the shift should be outlawed because it so hurt Jay Bruce's career (a .244 career hitter). I love the logic: he's slow, and can't hit to all fields, doesn't have too much power, so IT'S NOT FAIR!!!! I suppose by the same logic: there are a lot of AA players who cannot hit curve balls. THEREFORE, the curve ball needs to be banned.

    Or was the whole damn article written tongue-in-cheek? (If so, just call me the usual names and move on.)
    I hope he was being sardonic.

    While the shift is not good for the offense of the overall game, what defensive strategy in any sport is? Teams and players have to learn to overcome defenses. That's the nature of all team sports...

  9. #84
    TalkSox Godhead mvp 78's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jad View Post
    Did you see Verducci's article in SI whining that the shift should be outlawed because it so hurt Jay Bruce's career (a .244 career hitter). I love the logic: he's slow, and can't hit to all fields, doesn't have too much power, so IT'S NOT FAIR!!!! I suppose by the same logic: there are a lot of AA players who cannot hit curve balls. THEREFORE, the curve ball needs to be banned.

    Or was the whole damn article written tongue-in-cheek? (If so, just call me the usual names and move on.)
    He's been on the ban the shift train for a long while now.
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  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp 78 View Post
    He's been on the ban the shift train for a long while now.
    Yeah but I would expect Verducci to come up with a better argument than it cut short the career of a 14 year MLB veteran...

  11. #86
    TalkSox Godhead mvp 78's Avatar
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    From the article:

    Meanwhile, evidence that the shift is harming careers and the entertainment value of the game continues to mount. Entering this week, the major league batting average was .233, the third-lowest April batting average in the 102 years of the live ball era (1943, 1968). Batting average on balls in play is down to .286, the lowest in 29 years. Hits are at an all-time low. Strikeouts are at an all-time high.

    Strikeouts aren't at an all time high because of the shift. We're here because of the launch angle.

    Honestly, I don't think the shift affects pace of play. If you want to beat the shift, learn to hit the other way.

    The shift has been around since Ted Williams.
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  12. #87
    TalkSox Godhead mvp 78's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by notin View Post
    Yeah but I would expect Verducci to come up with a better argument than it cut short the career of a 14 year MLB veteran...
    He didn't want to say "guy in his 30's could no longer hit a fastball."
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  13. #88
    TalkSox Godhead mvp 78's Avatar
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    The percentage of at bats in which the ball is not put in play (home runs, walks, strikeouts, hit batters) is up to 38%.

    And yet he's still blaming the shift. WTF?
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  14. #89
    Deity Bellhorn04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp 78 View Post
    From the article:

    Meanwhile, evidence that the shift is harming careers and the entertainment value of the game continues to mount. Entering this week, the major league batting average was .233, the third-lowest April batting average in the 102 years of the live ball era (1943, 1968). Batting average on balls in play is down to .286, the lowest in 29 years. Hits are at an all-time low. Strikeouts are at an all-time high.

    Strikeouts aren't at an all time high because of the shift. We're here because of the launch angle.

    Honestly, I don't think the shift affects pace of play. If you want to beat the shift, learn to hit the other way.

    The shift has been around since Ted Williams.
    The shift has been around since Ted Williams, sure, but the systematic, metrics-based use of the shift on virtually every at-bat most certainly hasn't.
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  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp 78 View Post
    From the article:

    Meanwhile, evidence that the shift is harming careers and the entertainment value of the game continues to mount. Entering this week, the major league batting average was .233, the third-lowest April batting average in the 102 years of the live ball era (1943, 1968). Batting average on balls in play is down to .286, the lowest in 29 years. Hits are at an all-time low. Strikeouts are at an all-time high.

    Strikeouts aren't at an all time high because of the shift. We're here because of the launch angle.

    Honestly, I don't think the shift affects pace of play. If you want to beat the shift, learn to hit the other way.

    The shift has been around since Ted Williams.
    The shift has been around since the 1920's. The famous "Williams Shift" actually predates the career of Ted Williams and is not named after him.

    "The infield shift strategy is often associated with Ted Williams, but it was actually first employed against Cy Williams during the 1920s.[1][2] Cy Williams, a left-handed outfielder with the Chicago Cubs (1912–1917) and Philadelphia Phillies (1918–1930), was second only to Babe Ruth in major league career home runs from 1923 to 1928. Opposing defenses would shift 'practically to the entire right side' when he batted.[3]"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infield_shift

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